Free Stuff!!

Information Security part:

It is not uncommon for malicious parties to send out e-mail or other communications with the text “Free Stuff!!” as part of the subject line or emblazoned in bold letters across the top of the ad.  Often this lure of the possibility of getting something free is irresistible to we human beings.

This means we, as consumers of technology, need to be cautious whenever we see offers that seem too good to be true.  In one of my favorite childhood science fiction books, The Moon is a Harsh Mistress by Robert Heinlein, I learned to look carefully at free offers through the lens of the acronym TANSTAAFL.

“There Ain’t No Such Thing As A Free Lunch” means simply that there is often a hidden cost behind “free” offers, and that an intelligent person will be certain to look for that cost before jumping onto any “free” bandwagon.

Non-Information Security part (sort-of):

I’ve mentioned before that I would periodically include in this blog things outside the realm of information security if I found it interesting and worth sharing.  This is one of those times.

Microsoft yesterday announced that they are increasing in July the amount of storage space allocated to users of their OneDrive cloud file storage.  OneDrive allows users to access saved files through the internet from anywhere, using any computer or device (such as a smart phone or pad).

The amount of storage space available in the “free” (advertiser supported) version of OneDrive is increasing from 7 GB (gigabytes) to 15 GB.

Microsoft also offers paid OneDrive subscriptions, the first as a stand alone product for which they are charging $1.99 for 100 GB [previously $7.49] or $3.99 for 200 GB [previously $11.49] per month.

The second subscription version is associated with the various (and variously priced) versions of their online Office 365 product.  They have not changed the price of the monthly or annual Office 365 subscriptions, but are changing the amount of OneDrive space available to subscribers to 1 TB (terabytes; equivalent to about 1,000 GB).  This is a HUGE amount of personal storage space!

This offer, including it’s “free” version, may well be worth checking out if you are interested in personal cloud storage of your files.

Privacy Disclaimer

It is important to always keep in mind that in storing your personal files “in the cloud” –whether it is OneDrive or other free or paid offerings, like BOXDropBoxGoogle Drive, Amazon Cloud,  Apple’s iCloud, or any other company–those files are resting on servers controlled by whichever company is providing the service.

This means they are subject to disclosure either to certain company technical employees or through legal requests, to courts or law-enforcement officials.  Just as with files stored on college systems, they are not totally protected from disclosure in certain situations.

However, if you make an informed decision, weighing the benefit of using such personal file storage services against their hidden costs (such as lack of perfect privacy), they can be pretty useful, especially if you access files from multiple locations on multiple devices.

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