Tag Archives: user awareness

FBI Warning for Students

Hope your new year is going well!

The FBI has recently posted a warning about a scam that is targeting students in search of employment.

I won’t go into details here, as the FBI has published the full information they have as a public service announcement on their website at: https://www.ic3.gov/media/2017/170118.aspx

Even if you are not a student it is worth reading for the insight it gives to how malicious actors are trying to exploit the desire of students and graduates to find work.

Safe Computing!

Holiday Season Security

The state of Washington Office of Cybersecurity has recently posted a good article related to information security and online shopping at http://cybersecurity.wa.gov/resources/security-tips/.  This is a good time of year for this kind of reminder as we all are taking advantage of the convenience and ease of shopping online.

It cannot be emphasized enough that we each must constantly take care with our private information, particularly financial information like bank accounts and credit cards, and particularly when using or accessing such information using mobile devices.

Don’t trust public computers or wireless networks (even the college’s public Wi-Fi network) to be secure enough for these kinds of transactions.  It is not difficult for a malicious actor to be able to intercept wireless signals as they pass between your phone and the most secure wireless access point, thus having access to obtain whatever information you type into your device.  This could include account numbers, user names, passwords and personal identification numbers (PIN).

Do your online shopping with a trusted wired connection as often as you can (not with public computers like in a library or college computer labs–you never know if the person using it before you compromised the machine).  If you must use a mobile device, like a phone or tablet, be certain to follow the OCS guidelines to make your shopping “trip” as uneventful as possible.

Safe Computing!

 

Seasonal Phishing

Did you know that Phishing has a season, just like real fishing?

Statistics show that during the year-end holiday period, malicious users are more successful with phishing attacks about holiday giving or shopping because they tailor their message to fit the hustle and bustle and activities of the season.

Here is a short videowhich reminds all of us not to let our guard down just because we are too busy or distracted to carefully scrutinize an e-mail advertises a sale or touches our heart.

Have a good holiday season, and Safe Computing!

Video Reminders

The links below are to a couple of very short awareness videos published by a third-party which remind us of some of the basics related to the information security topics of malware and phishing.  Clicking on the links below will open the videos in a new browser window.

The principles discussed in each of these videos apply to both the workplace and to your use of technology at home.

If you are using Internet Explorer 10 or better, once you have gone to the shared OneDrive folder where these are stored, you can use the white pointers to move between the Individual videos without having to return to this page.

The arrows look like these:Right-pointing arrow head graphicLeft-pointing arrow head graphic

 

Other browsers will require you to click on each link individually.

Safe Computing!


Videos:

Don’t Let Malware Spoil the Fun! (1:50)

Phishing: What Would You Do? (1:24)

Cybersecurity Awareness… or not?

An interesting exchange of opinions recently occurred between two of my favorite news sources related to information technology security.

Since we are still in the midst of a month declared by the federal government as “Cybersecurity Awareness Month” (see both https://www.dhs.gov/national-cyber-security-awareness-month and https://staysafeonline.org/ncsam/), which is an effort to increase security awareness among regular technology users, the disagreement is interesting.

The premise of “cybersecurity awareness” is that all computer users need to be trained to be more knowledgeable and to apply their experience, knowledge and expertise in making the use of modern technology more secure.  This is a worthy goal, I believe.

However, Bruce Schneier,  a highly respected security expert and author, persuasively argued recently that maybe the computing industry should be less focused on educating the user and more on fixing the current state of technology:

Stop Trying to Fix the User

I am sure that many technology users will agree that there are basic technology fixes that should happen!  However, Lance Spitzer, the training director for the Securing the Human of the SANS Institute and security blogger for Educause disagreed with Bruce’s emphasis on the technology:

Why Bruce is Wrong

The college’s Information Technology Services division does as much as can be done technically to ensure that all users have as safe a computing experience as they can on campus.  However, given the state of computing technology, solving IT security issues with technical solutions is never going to be enough to make them non-existent.

Every one of you, as users of college systems, are still an important part of a robust security solution, and your ability to recognize something is wrong often proves better than the best technology solution.

So in a way, both of these authors are correct:  There absolutely should be better, more secure technological ways of doing some of the everyday things we do with computers, like click a link or login, but until that exists, users need to be better trained and more aware of how to evaluate the risks inherent in technology use on a daily basis and to respond when they experience attacks by malicious users.

This  will continue to be an interesting discussion, I think…

Safe Computing!