Faculty Seniority List

TENURED AND TENURE-TRACK FACULTY 

  1. Gordon Leighton Tenured
  2. Laura Burns Tenured
  3. Michael Meyer Tenured
  4. Jeffery White Tenured
  5. Scott Bessho Tenured
  6. Steve Yarborough Tenured
  7. James Torrence Tenured
  8. Suzy Lepeintre Tenured
  9. Donna Miguel Tenured
  10. David Lopez-Kopp Tenured
  11. Megan Hansen Tenured
  12. Sean Allen  Tenured
  13. Elizabeth Harazim Tenured
  14. Hyesu Park Tenure-Track
  15. Nan Ma Tenure-Track
  16. Natalie Martinez Tenure-Track
  17. Catherine Berkenfield Tenure-Track
  18. Craig Hurd-McKenney Tenure-Track
  19. Fernando Perez Tenure-Track

TEMPORARY FULL TIME FACULTY

  1. Jun Xu
  2. Ron Holland
  3. Lindsay Haney

AFFILIATED ADJUNCT FACULTY

  1. Kathleen White
  2. Jim Goldsmith

NON-AFFILIATED ADJUNCT FACULTY

  1. Karrin Peterson
  2. Barbara Butler
  3. Paula Sebastian
  4. Lynne Walker
  5. Cassie Cross
  6. Donna Cowan
  7. Pat Mesch
  8. Ewan Magie
  9. Martha Silano
  10. Katie Austin Miranda
  11. Michael Beasley
  12. Elizabeth Kraus
  13. Tobi Rosenberg
  14. Gary Olson
  15. Isaiah Hemmen
  16. Steven Kent
  17. Tom Ryan
  18. Dan Tremaglio
  19. Renee Dickinson

 

 

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Outcomes Spring 2014

STEPS (071, 072, 073, 074) Outcomes

Reading

  • Students will improve reading speed and fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension

Writing

  • Students will improve written content (accuracy, completeness, development), organization, and editing skills.

Information Literacy

  • Students will improve information literacy skills.

089 Outcomes

 Mechanics of reading

 Students will improve

1. Level of Vocabulary

2. Comprehension of main idea

3. Inference skills

4. Speed

Self-awareness

Students will develop

1. more awareness of their own reading styles as an active reader

2. better ability to motivate selves and activate schema

3. more options for approaching texts

 106 Outcomes

Mechanics of reading

Students will demonstrate ability to

1. understand vocabulary at level 10 or higher

2. comprehend  main idea in college-level texts

3. improve ability to infer ideas and draw logical conclusions

Self-awareness

Students will develop

1. more awareness of their own reading styles as an active reader

2. better ability to motivate selves and activate schema

3. more options for approaching texts 

092/093 outcomes

Reading

  • Students will be able to identify a writer’s impact or purpose, audience, and evaluate the text.

Writing

  • Students will be able to compose, revise, and edit a multi-paged essay.

Information Literacy

  • Students will be able to evaluate texts and sources.

English 101: College Composition I

 After completing this course, students will be able to… 

Think Critically and Read Analytically:  carefully analyze, interpret and evaluate claims, beliefs, texts and/or issues.

  • frame questions, define problems, and position arguments.
  • consider multiple points of view and differentiate between assumptions, beliefs, facts, opinions, and biases.
  • read and respond to various texts critically for purposes of interpretation, analysis, synthesis, evaluation, and/or judgment.
  • demonstrate an understanding of a text’s main point/thesis and its relevant supporting details.

Compose and Revise in Context:shape written responses for different audiences and purposes.

  • shape written responses to suit different rhetorical situations and audiences.
  • develop flexible strategies for prewriting, drafting, revising, and editing.
  • develop and support thesis statements that are appropriately complex and significant.
  • construct unified paragraphs with topic sentences and supporting details that advance the thesis.
  • use various methods of development such as illustration, comparison and contrast, and/or analysis.
  • balance their individual voices with those from other texts.
  • employ style, tone, and mechanical conventions appropriate to the demands of a particular audience or purpose.

Reflect, Collaborate & Evaluate:recognize and incorporate newly acquired skills, both individually and with peers.

  • develop the ability to critique their own and others’ work.
  • gain a clearer perspective of habits that may detract from the effectiveness of their own writing.
  • respond to comments from their instructor and peers.   

English 201: The Research Paper 

After completing this course, students will be able to… 

Think Critically and Read Analytically to Evaluate Different Types of Evidence:  carefully analyze, interpret and evaluate claims, beliefs, texts and/or issues.

  • frame questions, define problems, and position arguments.
  • consider multiple points of view and differentiate between assumptions, beliefs, facts, opinions, and biases.
  • read and respond to various texts critically for purposes of interpretation, analysis, synthesis, evaluation, and/or judgment.
  • demonstrate an understanding of a text’s main point/thesis and its relevant supporting details.
  • Develop an original and effectively supported thesis statement that is appropriately complex and significant. 

Compose an Argument That Synthesizes Source Material with Own Writing and Revise in Context Honestly:shape researched, written responses for different audiences and purposes.

  • write arguments to suit different rhetorical situations and audiences.
  • continue developing flexible strategies for prewriting, drafting, revising, and editing.
  • construct unified paragraphs with topic sentences and supporting details that advance the thesis.
  • use various methods of development such as illustration, comparison and contrast, and/or analysis.
  • balance their individual voices with those from other texts.
  • employ style, tone, and mechanical conventions appropriate to the demands of a particular audience or purpose.
  • use proper in-text citations and bibliographic pages to avoid plagiarism.

Reflect, Collaborate & Evaluate:recognize and incorporate newly acquired skills, both individually and with peers.

  • develop the ability to critique their own and others’ work.
  • gain a clearer perspective of habits that may detract from the effectiveness of their own writing.
  • respond to comments from their instructor and peers.   

Use these below! 201 updated Robin outcomes

  • Locate and evaluate different types of evidence for logic, credibility, reliability, and bias (i.e. primary sources, online and written secondary sources)
  • Compose humanities style research papers that include an evaluation of different types of evidence to support an original thesis and language appropriate for the audience and purpose.
  • Synthesize own writing with a breadth of primary and secondary sources with proper in text citations and a Works Cited page that avoids plagiarism.
  • Develop an original and effectively supported thesis statement that is appropriately complex and significant.

ENGL 271/272

  • Investigate and analyze non-fiction writing
  • Identify and cultivate personal voice as a writer
  • Prewrite, draft, revise and edit using rhetorical formats to produce expository writing
  • Collaborate, evaluate and reflect in class discussions, group work, and course assignments to improve rhetorical effectiveness

ENGL 235

  • Understand and recognize the purpose and process of communication in business and industry
  • Differentiate between effective and ineffective technical communication
  • Produce complete, accurate and ethical technical communication in various types of documents for different audiences
  • Collaborate, evaluate and reflect in class discussions, group work, and course assignments to improve rhetorical effectiveness

All Literature Class Outcomes

  • Describe the expressive and rhetorical power of language
  • Discuss their understanding of the historical and social contexts of literary texts and their contemporary relevance
  • Critically analyze a literary text
  • Use genre-specific knowledge and approach to read and write about literature

ENGLISH 247/8/9

  • ‘Control word choices and word order to create a particular mood or tone
  • Explore ideas using different tones or personas
  • Employ metaphors, similes, symbols and other forms of figurative language
  • Employ sound as a device, through alliteration, assonance, etc.
  • Use meter and rhyme
  • Identify the characteristics of conventional poetic forms, as well as open form poetry
  • Critique works in progress
  • Edit final drafts in a collection of their poetry
  • Identify publication methods for poetry

ENGLISH 253/4/5

  • Identify distinguishing characteristics of creative non-fiction
  • Control sentence structure, length and word choice to create a particular mood, tone and narrative persona
  • Identify subjective and objective perspectives in creative non-fiction
  • Apply literary devices to personal experience to develop a theme
  • Apply literary devices to personal experiences/perspectives to create narrative veracity
  • Explore subjects and theme using variations of subjective and objective perspective
  • Critique, revise and edit works in progress

ENGLISH 237/8/9

  • Distinguish between plot and story
  • Show, rather than tell, by using specific details, naming nouns and strong, active verbs
  • Develop scenes
  • Create believable characters through description, action, scene, and dialogue
  • Establish and sustain a point of view
  • Create and sustain tension
  • Control sentence structure, length and word choice to create a particular tone and mood
  • Critique, revise, and edit works in progress

 

 

 

 

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Summer food for thought #1: “Remediation” issues

While we have incorporated some of the multiple measures advocated in this article from Inside Higher Ed, issues with how to best serve (or manage) the population of underprepared students remain.  The Common Core standards, also mentioned in the article, are the focus of the Smarter Balanced Assessment that our state is slowly adopting and that we have a chance to help shape along with local high schools.

-Scott B.

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Outcomes- Creative Writing

ENGLISH 247/8/9: Writing Poetry

  • ‘Control word choices and word order to create a particular mood or tone
  • Explore ideas using different tones or personas
  • Employ metaphors, similes, symbols and other forms of figurative language
  • Employ sound as a device, through alliteration, assonance, etc.
  • Use meter and rhyme
  • Identify the characteristics of conventional poetic forms, as well as open form poetry
  • Critique works in progress
  • Edit final drafts in a collection of their poetry
  • Identify publication methods for poetry

ENGLISH 253/4/5: Writing Creative Non-Fiction

  • Identify distinguishing characteristics of creative non-fiction
  • Control sentence structure, length and word choice to create a particular mood, tone and narrative persona
  • Identify subjective and objective perspectives in creative non-fiction
  • Apply literary devices to personal experience to develop a theme
  • Apply literary devices to personal experiences/perspectives to create narrative veracity
  • Explore subjects and theme using variations of subjective and objective perspective
  • Critique, revise and edit works in progress

ENGLISH 237/8/9: Writing Fiction

  • Distinguish between plot and story
  • Show, rather than tell, by using specific details, naming nouns and strong, active verbs
  • Develop scenes
  • Create believable characters through description, action, scene, and dialogue
  • Establish and sustain a point of view
  • Create and sustain tension
  • Control sentence structure, length and word choice to create a particular tone and mood
  • Critique, revise, and edit works in progress

 

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Outcomes- Pre-College Composition

Pre-College courses prepare students to succeed in English 101.

English 092/093: Developmental Writing

Read and Think Critically

  •  Demonstrates ability to make reading connections in writing
  •  Uses appropriate college level vocabulary and academic language 
  • Summarizes accurately 
  • Demonstrate an awareness of themselves as learners of Academic Language
  • Actively participates in discussions concerning the interpretations of texts
  • Reflect, evaluate and
  •  draw conclusions about texts

Compose

  • Develop own writing process based on exposure to various established methods
  • Narrow scope of a topic for the purpose of development
  • Create organized, unified, well-developed text
  • Uses a variety of writing strategies including but not limited to description, narration, illustration, comparison, contrast and analysis

Revise

  • Develop self-editing and/or error recognition skill
  • Improve the ability to respond to critique from teachers and peers
  •  Improve the ability to critique their own work and others
  • Identify and break habits that detracts from effective writing

Editing

  • Uses correct Word Forms 
  • Uses basic verb tenses and forms appropriately
  • Uses correct suffixes to signal verbs, nouns, adjectives, and adverbs
  • Uses accurate subject verb agreement
  •  Improve sentence structure and variety; recognizes and avoid fragments and run-ons 
  • Improves ability to write concise sentences 
  •  Uses correct punctuation and mechanics

Revised 11/14/11

English 071/072/073/074 (STEPS)

Read and Comprehend at the 11th grade level;

  • Understand and use vocabulary at level 9.5 or above;
  • Demonstrate Reading Comprehension in their writing;
  • Summarize short (500-1000 word) passages;
  • Write essays of about 500 words that have a main point supported by appropriate evidence;
  • Demonstrate coherence in writing (repeated key words, and signals of an overall plan);
  • Identify the basic structural elements of simple and compound sentences (subject, verb, object, etc);
  • Be able to edit their own writing to avoid errors in such things as verb tense, plurals, possessives, word order, word forms, etc.

READING
To progress to English 092 or 093, students will demonstrate the following abilities:

Vocabulary

In readings at Level 10 or higher,

    • Use context clues to identify the meanings of unfamiliar words
    • In essays, use vocabulary and phrasing appropriate to topic. 

Comprehension

    • Using readings at Level 10 or higher,
    • Read accurately on two or three of the appropriate programs in the Reading Lab
    • Use pre-reading strategies such as scanning and skimming
    • Identify main idea and major and minor supporting details
    • Distinguish fact from opinion
    • Make inferences and draw conclusions
    • Identify purpose, audience, and point
    • Combine use of dictionary and context clues to recognize connotations and levels of formality
    • Write accurate summaries and paraphrases
    • In essays and discussion, accurately synthesize information from two or more written sources 

Speed and Fluency

    • Using readings at Level 10 or higher, read accurately at a speed of 250-300 wpm on one of the appropriate programs in the Reading Lab

WRITING

Language Mechanics

  • Identify parts of speech and their functions
  • Identify basic structural elements of sentences (subject, verb, object, phrase, dependent clause, independent clause)
  • Edit reading responses, summaries, and essays of 500 words or more for mistakes in
  • Five basic verb tenses (forms, shifts, and consistency)
  • Subject-verb agreement
  • Singular and plural word forms
  • Pronouns (shifts, referents, forms)
  • Noun, verb, adjective, and adverb forms
  • Articles and other determiners
  • Common collocations (see reading outcomes)
  • Prepositional and participial phrases
  • Adjective, adverb, and noun clauses
  • Word order (subject-verb-object, position of modifying phrases and clauses)
  • Complex parallel structure
  • Possessives, contractions, and quotations
  • Common homonyms (there, their, they’re, etc.)
  • Use and punctuate correctly a variety of sentence patterns (simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex)

Composition Skills

  • Accurately paraphrase passage written at Level 10 or higher, avoiding plagiarism and identifying sources
  • Accurately summarize reading written at Level 10 or higher without interjecting own opinions
  • Respond appropriately to different kinds of prompts
  • Follow a writing process (pre-write, outline, draft and redraft, revise (alter content), edit (correct mechanics), proofread (make final corrections)
  • Apply skills developed in Dev Ed and ELI to respond to readings written at level 10 or above
  • Write essays of 500 words or more that have thoughtful main point supported by appropriate evidence
  • Maintain focus on point throughout essay of five or more paragraphs
  • Use specific, concrete detail and avoid empty generalizations
  • Connect ideas by using repeated key words, transition words, and signals of overall plan
  • Structure paragraphs using narration, description, exposition, and comparison/contrast
  • Use vocabulary, phrasing, and tone appropriate to topic and audience
  • Use a word processor appropriately (including spell-checker) to write, revise, and edit

Critical Thinking Skills

  • Distinguish between fact and opinion
  • Reason credibly
  • Qualify statements appropriately
  • Recognize own biases and values and acknowledge perspective of others
  • Synthesize information from two or more sources
  • Respond to readings written at Level 10 or above with depth of thought that reflects understanding of original and expresses meaningful relationship to self and/or society
  • Evaluate sources

 

English 106: Critical Reading in the Humanities

After completing this class, students should be able to:

  • Identify patterns of organization which provide order to written text. 
  • Identify and explain the rhetorical balance which must exist among the writer, the audience [reader], and the writing [text] in an example of expository writing
  •  List strategies for distinguishing major ideas [thesis, theme, etc.] from the supporting details 
  • Prepare an outline – using traditional outline criteria, a mapping technique, or a visual diagram – of a whole piece of text, so that the sequence of key ideas and their relationship to one another is traced through the entire work.
  • Identify characteristics of and strategies for reading text in a variety of subject areas in the arts, the sciences, and the social sciences. 
  •  Identify ways to read actively, rather than passively. 
  •  Identify literal information in a given piece of text. Distinguish this information from information which can be inferred from the same text. 
  •  Locate examples of fact in a given piece of text. Distinguish this information from information which can be classified as opinion. 
  • Identify reading tasks at a variety of cognitive levels and distinguish them from reading tasks at other cognitive levels. 
  •  Identify reading tasks associated with the learning paradigms of philosophers and/or learning theorists such as Plato, Bloom, etc. 
  •  Identify criteria, which characterize a critical reader. 
  •  Summarize a writer’s underlying, but unstated, assumptions in a given selection of text. 
  • Select a piece of writing which contains symbolism and/or imagery, and explain how the writer’s use of figurative language enhances MEANING 
  • Identify ways to evaluate the effectiveness of a selected piece of text based on the information it contains and the writer’s strategies for communicating that information.

English 089: Preparation for College Reading

There seems to be no recorded outcomes. The following is a course description:

English 089, Preparation for College Reading, helps students develop strategies for effective reading and critical analysis of textbook readings with emphasis on discipline differences. English 089 is coordinated with parallel reading lab sections that emphasize acquisition of vocabulary and development of literal and inferential comprehension skills.

 

 

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Outcomes- Composition

English 101: College Composition I

 After completing this course, students will be able to…

 Think Critically and Read Analytically:  carefully analyze, interpret and evaluate claims, beliefs, texts and/or issues.

  • frame questions, define problems, and position arguments.
  • consider multiple points of view and differentiate between assumptions, beliefs, facts, opinions, and biases. 
  • read and respond to various texts critically for purposes of interpretation, analysis, synthesis, evaluation, and/or judgment.
  • demonstrate an understanding of a text’s main point/thesis and its relevant supporting details.

Compose and Revise in Context: shape written responses for different audiences and purposes.

  • shape written responses to suit different rhetorical situations and audiences.   
  • develop flexible strategies for prewriting, drafting, revising, and editing.  
  • develop and support thesis statements that are appropriately complex and significant.
  • construct unified paragraphs with topic sentences and supporting details that advance the thesis.
  • use various methods of development such as illustration, comparison and contrast, and/or analysis.
  • balance their individual voices with those from other texts.
  • employ style, tone, and mechanical conventions appropriate to the demands of a particular audience or purpose.

Reflect & Evaluate: recognize and incorporate newly acquired skills.

  • develop the ability to critique their own and others’ work.
  • gain a clearer perspective of habits that may detract from the effectiveness of their own writing.
  • respond to comments from their instructor and peers.  

English 201: The Research Paper

 After completing this course, students will be able to…

  • Write a humanities-style research paper that includes as part of its composition or process:
  • An objective summary of college-level material which identifies primary and supporting assertions
  • An evaluation of different types of evidence (i.e. tone/diction, logical reasoning)
  • A synthesis of source material with own writing
  • An original and supported thesis
  • Proper in- text citations and Works Cited page
  • A breadth of varied primary sources which demonstrates a familiarity with library research skills 

English 235: Technical Writing

 After completing this course, students will be able to…

  • Write documents such as summaries, instruction manuals, analyses, proposals, and research reports, using accepted professional formats
  • Design a research strategy to solve a specific problem for a specific client
  • Conduct primary and secondary research
  • Propose a clearly reasoned, convincingly supported solution to a client’s problem
  • Paraphrase, summarize, and quote information with integrity and document sources accurately, following the accepted form for the field of inquiry.
  • Design visually effective documents and presentations
  • Revise and edit to improve clarity, economy, and rhetorical effectiveness

 *These are found on the course descriptions website

 At completion of the course, each student should be able to: 

  • Understand the purpose and process of communication in business and industry.
  • Recognize and be able to analyze effective and ineffective technical communication.

 

English 271/2/3: Expository Writing

 After completing this course, students will be able to…

  • Identify implicitly and/or explicitly one’s intentions as a writer
  • Define implicitly and/or explicitly the audience for a particular piece of writing
  • Apply appropriate style, tone and format to the writer’s purpose and audience
  • Use rhetorical formats conventional to expository writing
  • Demonstrate objectivity towards one’s own writing
  • Demonstrate practical uses/applications for expository writing beyond the college classroom

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DOCS – Literature Schedule 2014-2015

You can view all of our course descriptions at http://www.bellevuecollege.edu/classes/All/ENGL

Fall   2014
Winter 2105
Spring  2015
Sum  2015

 ENGL  111 –Introduction to Literature Elizabeth

ENGL 111 ONLINE – Introduction to Literature James

ENGL 221 – Popular Literature James

 ENGL 244 – Early American Literature LINKED TO ENGL 101 Nan

ENGL 261 – American Literature – Essential Black Voices Hyesu

 *ENGL 224 Shakespeare I Gordon

 

*Rotates Every Other Year

ENGL 224 rotates every other year with ENGL 210 Introduction to   European Literature OR ENGL 228 Historical Perspectives in Literature – Brit   Lit

 

 

 ENGL  111 – 
 Introduction to   Literature NEW HIRE

ENGL 112 – Introduction to Fiction Jeffery 

ENGL 115 – Film as Literature Scott 

ENGL 221 ONLINE – Popular Literature Laura 

ENGL 245 – American Literature Realistic Period Sean 

ENGL 260 – American Literature – Harlem Renaissance Suzy 

ENGL 215 – Myth, Folklore & Legend Steve

ENGL 219/220 – World Literature Natalie

 

ENGL  111 –Introduction to Literature David 

ENGL 112 – 
 
Introduction to Fiction Craig

 ENGL 113 –
Introduction to Poetry Natalie

ENGL 221 ONLINE – Popular Literature Rhonda 

ENGL 245 – American Literature Realistic Period – Gordon 

ENGL 246 – Modern American Literature Nan 

*ENGL 276 Women Writers Megan 

Wildcard!  Choose any   literature class! Hyesu

 

*Rotating every 3rd   year, always as links:

ENGL 241 – Bible As Literature    2014

ENGL 276 – Women Writers – 2015

ENGL  279 – King Arthur   2016

 

 

ENGL    111 – Introduction to Literature STAFF

1 200   level (ENGL 221 Popular Literature or   class for special population, such as: ENGL 223 Children’s Literature or ENGL   221 Shakespeare )  STAFF

 

 

 

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DOCS – Creative Writing Schedule 2014-2015

This is the 2014-2015 course schedule and faculty assignments for the Creative Writing Program.    If you are interested in our Creative Writing Program you should contact Laura Burns or Jeffery White.

 FALL  2014 (already scheduled by Suzy)                                                     

237/8/9 On-Ground         Jeffery White                   
237/8/9  Online   Rhonda Gilliam                             
247/8/9 On-Ground      Fernando  Perez                              
253/4/5 Online         Jim Goldsmith

WINTER 2015

237/8/9 On-Ground    Nan Ma
237/8/9 online   Cassie Cross
247/8/9 online   Julianne Seeman
253/4/5 online   Elizabeth Harazim 

SPRING 2015

237/8/9 On-Ground         Steven Kent
237/8/9 online   Isaiah Hemmen
247/8/9 online   Martha Silano

 SUMMER 2015

237/8/9 On-Ground    Cassie Cross
237/8/9 Online  Isaiah Hemmen
247/8/9 Online   Jim Dicus
253/4/5 Online   Laura Burns

 

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2014_06_05 End-of-Quarter TO DO LIST

End of the Quarter Pressure!

There is too much to do (force) and too little time left in the quarter (area).     In the future, Scott and Suzy will try to move some of these required tasks further away from the end of the quarter to relieve some of that pressure.  For this quarter, we are thankful for your stamina and your patience.  Here is a list of what each faculty member needs to get done.

Assessment Charts

Submit an assessment chart for each of the course sections you are teaching for the English department this quarter.   Remember that adjunct faculty are paid $40 per completed chart as long as the charts are submitted by June 30th.   You will find instructions on how to this at https://bc.instructure.com/courses/829528

Student Evaluations

Opt-in to online course evaluations AND provide an incentive to your students to complete the online course evaluations.  I (Suzy) cannot tell you how many times I have put this off and then forgotten about it.   I am guilty of not doing enough to encourage my students to evaluate me.  I regret it.   And as soon as I’m done with this post, I’m going to create an assignment for extra credit to encourage my students to evaluate me.   Opt-in at https://www.bellevuecollege.edu/classeval/educator/

Remember that you can arrange for Seda Markarova (seda.markarova@bellevuecollege) to administer student evaluations with your students face-to-face if you wish, although, at this point in the quarter, she might be booked.    All tenure-track and adjunct faculty are contractually required to have students evaluate all of their classes.  All full-time faculty should evaluate all of their classes, but they are required to evaluate the classes they were assigned to evaluate at the beginning of the school year.

OK.  I’m going to set a timer so I don’t forget to this when I’m done with this post.  

Course Outcomes Working Meeting

Friday, June 13th we will meet as a full department from 1:30 – 4:30 and rewrite all of our course outcomes.  We are doing this to support the college’s preparation for an accreditation visit.  Adjunct faculty will be paid for attending.  Please don’t hesitate to come for only part of the workshop if that is all you can manage.  Your expertise and insight are needed!

Winter 2015 Course Preferences

Suzy will be sending out a draft Winter 2014 schedule on June 12th and I will be asking adjunct faculty for their preferences.  Please provide me with a bit of context.  Are there times of the day you cannot teach for us?  Are there modalities you do not feel prepared to teach well in?  Are there classes you don’t feel comfortable teaching?  And then, finally, what would be some ideal schedules?

Suzy will take the requests and then use them, during the summer, to build a Winter schedule.  You won’t be able to find out what you’ve been assigned before mid-summer.  The room assignment schedule and publishing schedule just put some critical deadlines in the middle of the summer. 

Remember that the English department decided that starting Winter 2015, no instructor will be assigned three classes completely online. 

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2014_06_05 June Hot News

English Program Coordinators 
Fire Up Again!

Program Coordinators were established when Maggie Harada was chair of the English department to help shoulder the huge leaderships tasks that come with a huge department.

Creative Writing – Laura Burns and Jeffery White
Literature –  Elizabeth Harazim and Nan Ma
Pre-College Programs – Sean Allen
Accelerated Program – David Lopez-Kopp and Donna Miguel
Composition and Technical Writing – Natalie Martinez

Heat’s On!  Course Outcomes –
Working Meeting Friday, June 13th 1:30 – 3:30

One of the first tasks the coordinators will be leading us through is the redesign of course outcomes for ALL of our English courses.  This work must be done by June 30th, 2014 in order to help the college prepare for our upcoming accreditation visit.  (Yes, we, too, are rolling our eyes.  Again?  Revise them again?!)

We need the expertise of as many English department faculty members as possible at this meeting.  We would like to move through  all of our outcomes in this single three hour meeting.  Adjunct faculty will be paid for attending.

On Fire!

Affiliation Re-ignites

Scott and Suzy are happy to announce that eight faculty members have been granted affiliated status for the 2014-2015 school year.  Congratulations to Barbara Butler, Donna Cowan, Karrin Peterson, Debbie Pope, Cassie Cross, Tobi Rosenberg, Paula Sebastian, and Lynne Walker.    These annually affiliated faculty will join our life-time affiliated faculty, Nancy Eichner, James Goldsmith, and Kathleen White  If you have questions about affiliation or are interested in applying for affiliation next year,  contact Suzy Lepeintre or Scott Bessho.

Dissertation Defended!

Hyesu Park has successfully defended her dissertation!  Please congratulate Dr. Park when you see her next.   Hyesu’s dissertation is focused on post-1945 Asian American literature.  She  explores the continued formation of Asian American literature after WWII as well as investigating how it interfaces with American literature.  She pays particular attention to how authors choose to reframe historical events to  create innovative fictions.

100-level Technical Writing Course to Pilot Fall 2014

Karrin Peterson is on track to pilot a 100-level Technical Writing class this Fall.  The course will run as  ENGL 194 – Special Studies in English while she pilots the curriculum.  All seats for the pilot will be reserved for students in the Autism Spectrum Navigators Program.    Maggie Harada, Michelle Chavez, Susan Roselle, and Sara Gardner (from the Disability Resource Center) are all part of the team Karrin is working with to bring this about.   We are very grateful to everyone involved for seeking to create this option for students.

Discipline Specific English 101 Sections to Pilot Fall 2014

Nan Ma, Jim Dicus, Paula Sebastian, and Lynne Walker will launch discipline specific English 101 sections for Fall 2014!  Nan has been working with programs across the campus to develop discipline specific English 101 sections.  Faculty in Business have been the first to engage fully with the project and because of that engagement, Nan, Jim, Paula and Lynne are ready to move forward and offer Business content specific English 101 sections this Fall.

Superstars Seeking New Horizons

Tenured English instructor Roger George and reading lab instructor Belle Geodeke are retiring.  It’s unbelievable.  How can we picture the English Department and the Reading Lab without them?  They are joining other stellar colleagues like Pat Andrus, Arline Davis and Linda Leeds, who officially separated from the college earlier this Spring.

WAC Workshops in the Faculty Commons Spring 2014

Nan Ma has been working for the Faculty Commons, developing and leading a variety of workshops designed to help faculty across the disciplines teach and assess writing in their classes.   Nan organized the following workshops this Spring 2014

  • Writing Prompt Design with co-presenters Catherine Berkenfield, Donna Cowan, and Roger George  
  • Grading Rubric Design and Revision Guidelines with co-presenters Natalie Martinez and Gordon Leighton
  • Effective Peer Reviews with co-presenters Elizabeth Harazim, David Lopez-Kopp, and Garrett Nichols

Each workshop generated rich and productive conversations about writing and teaching.  Instructors from Anthropology, Economics, Psychology, Chemistry and the Writing Lab participated and shared their approaches to teaching and using writing in their classrooms.  

University of New Mexico Mentoring Institute Conference

Catherine Berkenfield is the outgoing Faculty Lead of the Mentoring Programs in the Faculty Commons.  She’s built an amazing program and now gets to share her insights as a presenter at the October University of New Mexico Mentoring Institute Conference (http://mentor.unm.edu/).   

Reading Lab Revisioned

 The Reading Lab is experimenting with new models for supporting students’ reading success across disciplines.  All reading lab instructors will be taking the Reading Apprenticeship course and all accelerated 092/101 and 093/101 courses for Fall 2014 will bring their classes to the Reading Lab for small group and one-on-one reading support.    Questions?  Contact Megan Hansen

Program Progress

The Creative Writing Program faculty have met and decided upon an annual schedule of classes, complete with faculty course assignments.  They have provided Suzy with the 2014-2015 course schedule and faculty assignments.  If you are interested in getting involved with the Creative Writing program, contact Laura Burns or Jeffery White.

The Pre-College Program faculty have been developing shared curriculum for the STEPS program.  If you are interested in this curriculum project please contact Sean Allen.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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